An introduction to the female genital mutilation

Why are there different terms to describe FGM, such as female genital cutting and female circumcision? The terminology used for this procedure has gone through various changes. It is also sometimes argued that the term obscures the serious physical and psychological effects of genital cutting on women. It establishes a clear distinction from male circumcision.

An introduction to the female genital mutilation

To help the tissue bond, the girl's legs are tied together, often from An introduction to the female genital mutilation to ankle; the bindings are usually loosened after a week and removed after two to six weeks.

Reinfibulation can involve cutting the vagina again to restore the pinhole size of the first infibulation. This might be performed before marriage, and after childbirth, divorce and widowhood. The penetration of the bride's infibulation takes anywhere from 3 or 4 days to several months. Some who are unable to penetrate their wives manage to get them pregnant in spite of the infibulation, and the woman's vaginal passage is then cut open to allow birth to take place.

Those men who do manage to penetrate their wives do so often, or perhaps always, with the help of the "little knife". This creates a tear which they gradually rip more and more until the opening is sufficient to admit the penis.

From the age of eight, girls are encouraged to stretch their inner labia using sticks and massage. Girls in Uganda are told they may have difficulty giving birth without stretched labia. These were removed from the WHO's definition because of insufficient information about prevalence and consequences.

Introduction – Female Genital Mutilation

Gishiri cutting involves cutting the vagina's front or back wall with a blade or penknife, performed in response to infertility, obstructed labour and other conditions. In a study by Nigerian physician Mairo Usman Mandara, over 30 percent of women with gishiri cuts were found to have vesicovaginal fistulae holes that allow urine to seep into the vagina.

In the case of Type III, other factors include how small a hole was left for the passage of urine and menstrual blood, whether surgical thread was used instead of agave or acacia thorns, and whether the procedure was performed more than once for example, to close an opening regarded as too wide or re-open one too small.

A systematic review of 56 studies suggested that over one in ten girls and women undergoing any form of FGM, including symbolic nicking of the clitoris Type IVexperience immediate complications, although the risks increased with Type III.

The review also suggested that there was under-reporting. The practitioners' use of shared instruments is thought to aid the transmission of hepatitis Bhepatitis C and HIValthough no epidemiological studies have shown this.

Urine may collect underneath the scar, leaving the area under the skin constantly wet, which can lead to infection and the formation of small stones.

The opening is larger in women who are sexually active or have given birth by vaginal delivery, but the urethra opening may still be obstructed by scar tissue. Vesicovaginal or rectovaginal fistulae can develop holes that allow urine or faeces to seep into the vagina.

Complete obstruction of the vagina can result in hematocolpos and hematometra where the vagina and uterus fill with menstrual blood. Third-degree laceration tearsanal-sphincter damage and emergency caesarean section are more common in infibulated women.

The estimate was based on a study conducted on 28, women attending delivery wards at 28 obstetric centres in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Sudan. In those settings all types of FGM were found to pose an increased risk of death to the baby: The reasons for this were unclear, but may be connected to genital and urinary tract infections and the presence of scar tissue.

According to the study, FGM was associated with an increased risk to the mother of damage to the perineum and excessive blood lossas well as a need to resuscitate the baby, and stillbirthperhaps because of a long second stage of labour. Several small studies have concluded that women with FGM suffer from anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

One third reported reduced sexual feelings. Was any flesh or something removed from the genital area? Was your genital area sewn? In Eritrea, for example, a survey in found that all Hedareb girls had been infibulated, compared with two percent of the Tigrinyamost of whom fell into the "cut, no flesh removed" category.

Prevalence of female genital mutilation by country Downward trend Percentage of 15—49 group who have undergone FGM in 29 countries for which figures were available in [3] Percentage of 0—14 group who have undergone FGM in 21 countries for which figures were available in [3] FGM is mostly found in what Gerry Mackie called an "intriguingly contiguous" zone in Africa—east to west from Somalia to Senegal, and north to south from Egypt to Tanzania.

Over million women and girls are thought to be living with FGM in those 30 countries. The prevalence rate for the 0—11 group in Indonesia is 49 percent In Somalia and Sudan the situation was reversed: In half the countries for which national figures were available in —, most girls had been cut by age five.

In Kenya, for example, the Kisi cut around age 10 and the Kamba at For example, in the northeastern regions of Ethiopia and Kenya, which share a border with Somalia, the Somali people practise FGM at around the same rate as they do in Somalia.Female Genital Mutilation Introduction Pain, shame, lack of ability to reproduce.

Marie, who suffers from each of these symptoms, is one of the many women from . INTRODUCTION Female genital mutilation is the term now generally accepted for the traditional practices that entail removal of part or all of, or injury to the external genitalia of girls and women.

An introduction to the female genital mutilation

It does not include genital surgery . Introduction to FGC Female genital mutilation is a problem which affects over million women around the world.

Female genital mutilation is done for reasons which include religion and economics on girls in various parts of Africa and the Middle East. Female Genital Cutting (FGC): An Introduction ~ Marianne Sarkis As you are reading this article, there are between eight and ten million women and girls in the Middle East and in Africa who are at risk of undergoing one form or another of genital cutting.

An introduction to the female genital mutilation

Female genital mutilation (FGM), also known as female genital cutting and female circumcision, is the ritual cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. The practice is found in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and within communities from countries in which FGM is common.

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Female genital mutilation (FGM) - NHS